Get Out There And Market

Building relationships is the most important part of marketing. If you can go into a place, establish rapport and become friends with everyone, you’ll have it made. They’ll love to send business your way since they know their customers will be taken care of.

The next most important part is integrity. Don’t promise people things you can’t deliver. All that does is cause headaches. Clients won’t use you if you continually drop the ball.

If you’re in the business world, even with minimal business sense, I’m sure you know integrity is important. Go out there and charm everyone with your personality, do what you say you’ll do, and success is yours.

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The Breakdown

If you sell a product or service that can be sold in levels, do it. What I mean by this is start explaining and demonstrating your most expensive, premium service first. Look at popular products today and you’ll find different levels for different desires and needs. The Xbox 360 and IPod have different size hard drives available. At Burger King, you’ll find different size value meals.

While the products above don’t typically have professional salespeople pushing them, they do illustrate my point. If I were going to sell these products I’d always start by recommending the biggest and most expensive option. Detail the benefits of going big. Show them why they should have the best. Some people will accept the best and buy right away. Others will not.

Why won’t they? Some people can’t afford the biggest, most expensive thing you’ve got. Others might simply want exactly what they need. If price is a concern though, starting with the most expensive item and working your way down helps the customer to almost certainly buy the less expensive item. That’s called top down selling at its finest.

Give Them Hope

I recently had a customer who forgot an item in our rental car. The car had already been re-rented so we couldn’t check the car again. Of course we clean and check the cars as much as possible, but we miss things sometimes.

When the customer called asking about his item, he got the impression that there was no hope in finding it for him. He thought we couldn’t track cars at all and didn’t bother checking for items upon return. It’s unfortunate he felt the way he did, since we try our best to recover any personal effects in our rentals . We resolved the situation with him by finding his item and printing out a certificate for future use.

The moral of the story is that if we didn’t resolve the issue, negative word of mouth advertising would’ve spread. He wasn’t happy with how we initially handled ourselves in this position, which would’ve resulted in him telling people not to use Hertz. It’s also a reminder to tell people you’ll do absolutely everything possible to serve them.

Some Simple Advice

In sales, when you and your team have a stellar week, it’s easy to let up. Don’t allow yourself to slack off during the approaching weeks. Come out guns a blazin’ and keep the momentum going. Run with the “selling high” you achieved during the previous week. Besides, why wouldn’t you want to add more dollars to what you’ve already earned?

The Magic Number 7

This sales technique is simple yet takes discipline to use. All you need to do is overcome 7 objections in every sales presentation you do. With each objection you overcome, your prospect loses reasons to not buy. His buying barriers will fall. There’s something about the number 7 that makes people stop objecting and take the plunge.

Now, I say this takes discipline because it’s not easy to keep going sometimes. If someone holds up their hand just inches from your face saying no, no, no, would you keep trying to sell them? If they say “oh, I don’t need that” or “I can’t afford that,” make sure you have responses to those objections. If you sell insurance, tell them they can’t afford not to get it. If you sell hand held GPS systems, tell them they’ll never get lost again. And don’t forget to ask questions, find out what’s important to them and relate what you say to their needs.

Keep a mental running total of the objections you overcome. Then ask for the sale. You might be wildly surprised.

Drive a Mile in Your Customer’s Car

I want to avoid the phrase “Walk a mile in the other person’s shoes” and make that idea more applicable to renting cars. Point being, to do well in this business, you need to downshift and look at things from the perspective of your customer.

This means sympathize. Listen. Find solutions for your customers that match their needs. Not only will they trust you, they’ll feel you’re trying to help them. They’ll want to be your friend. They’ll come back to you when they need your services. Do this for every customer and you won’t fail.

Cohesion

When a sales or management team loosens their operation and become sloppy, nothing good comes from it. Tightening the operation always produces better results. Get everyone on the same page. In sales especially, consistency by everyone heeds top production. Consistency is presenting your goods and services the same way every time. Laziness is the ultimate killer.

Why Change is Important

In a growing and changing marketplace, if you keep doing the same thing, your business will die. Adaptation is important because trends and people change. If you don’t change with them, you’ll become a thing of the past.

Coming Up With Solutions

If you look at a problem and become frustrated, start thinking about possible solutions. If business is slow, find out why. Explore new avenues for success and find ways to increase revenue. Hit the streets and market aggressively. Sell harder. Get people in the door, buying, and leaving satisfied. Create raving fans.

In management, it’s essential to set goals for your people. At weekly meetings, discuss these goals and keep everyone on track. Without a road map and place you want to go, how can you expect to arrive at your destination?

Why Rewards Produce Huge Benefits

In my company, the top sellers each month are rewarded with the “Breakfast of Champions.” The general manager from the Pacific Northwest takes these sellers out to a fancy restaurant for breakfast. The reward is substantial. A great free breakfast, time off work to relax, and praise from a manager in high places.

Knowing that the Breakfast is obtainable with high enough sales numbers, employees work much harder to sell effectively and consistently. In Washington State, we’ve seen significant increases in revenue through stronger sales. Each employee is highly motivated by this honor.

Can a reward like this for your employees produce huge benefits in your business?